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Highlights of tax law

Highlights of the new tax reform law

The new tax reform law, commonly called the "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act" (TCJA), is the biggest federal tax law overhaul in 31 years, and it has both good and bad news for taxpayers.

Below are highlights of some of the most significant changes affecting individual and business taxpayers. Except where noted, these changes are effective for tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017.

Individuals

• Drops of individual income tax rates ranging from 0-4 percentage points (depending on the bracket) to 10 percent, 12 percent, 22 percent, 24 percent, 32 percent, 35 percent and 37 percent -- through 2025.

• Near doubling of the standard deduction to $24,000 (married couples filing jointly), $18,000 (heads of households) and $12,000 (singles and married couples filing separately) -- through 2025.

• Elimination of personal exemptions -- through 2025.

• Doubling of the child tax credit to $2,000 and other modifications intended to help more taxpayers benefit from the credit -- through 2025.

• Elimination of the individual mandate under the Affordable Care Act requiring taxpayers not covered by a qualifying health plan to pay a penalty -- effective for months beginning after Dec. 31, 2018.

• Reduction of the adjusted gross income (AGI) threshold for the medical expense deduction to 7.5 percent for regular and AMT purposes -- for 2017 and 2018.

• New $10,000 limit on the deduction for state and local taxes (on a combined basis for property and income taxes; $5,000 for separate filers) -- through 2025.

• Reduction of the mortgage debt limit for the home mortgage interest deduction to $750,000 ($375,000 for separate filers), with certain exceptions -- through 2025.

• Elimination of the deduction for interest on home equity debt -- through 2025.

• Elimination of the personal casualty and theft loss deduction (with an exception for federally declared disasters) -- through 2025.

• Elimination of miscellaneous itemized deductions subject to the 2 percent floor (such as certain investment expenses, professional fees and unreimbursed employee business expenses) -- through 2025.

• Elimination of the AGI-based reduction of certain itemized deductions -- through 2025.

• Elimination of the moving expense deduction (with an exception for members of the military in certain circumstances) -- through 2025.

• Expansion of tax-free Section 529 plan distributions to include those used to pay qualifying elementary and secondary school expenses, up to $10,000 per student per tax year.

• AMT exemption increase, to $109,400 for joint filers, $70,300 for singles and heads of households, and $54,700 for separate filers -- through 2025.

• Doubling of the gift and estate tax exemptions, to $10 million (expected to be $11.2 million for 2018 with inflation indexing) -- through 2025.

Businesses

• Replacement of graduated corporate tax rates ranging from 15-35 percent with a flat corporate rate of 21 percent.

• Repeal of the 20 percent corporate AMT.

• New 20 percent qualified business income deduction for owners of flow-through entities (such as partnerships, limited liability companies and S corporations) and sole proprietorships -- through 2025.

• Doubling of bonus depreciation to 100 percent and expansion of qualified assets to include used assets -- effective for assets acquired and placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017, and before Jan. 1, 2023.

• Doubling of the Section 179 expensing limit to $1 million and an increase of the expensing phaseout threshold to $2.5 million.

• Other enhancements to depreciation-related deductions.

• New disallowance of deductions for net interest expense in excess of 30 percent of the business's adjusted taxable income (exceptions apply).

• New limits on net operating loss (NOL) deductions.

• Elimination of the Section 199 deduction, also commonly referred to as the domestic production activities deduction or manufacturers' deduction -- effective for tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017, for noncorporate taxpayers and for tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2018, for C corporation taxpayers.

• New rule limiting like-kind exchanges to real property that is not held primarily for sale.

• New tax credit for employer-paid family and medical leave -- through 2019.

• New limitations on excessive employee compensation.

• New limitations on deductions for employee fringe benefits, such as entertainment and, in certain circumstances, meals and transportation.

More to consider

This is just a brief overview of some of the most significant TCJA provisions. There are additional rules and limits that apply, and the law includes many additional provisions. Contact Prince & Tuohey CPA Ltd. to learn more about how these and other tax law changes will affect you in 2018 and beyond.

Help prevent tax identity theft by filing early

If you're like many Americans, you might not start thinking about filing your tax return until close to this year's April 17 deadline. You might even want to file for an extension so you don't have to send your return to the IRS until Oct. 15.

But there's another date you should keep in mind: the day the IRS begins accepting 2017 returns (usually in late January). Filing as close to this date as possible could protect you from tax identity theft.

Why it helps

In an increasingly common scam, thieves use victims' personal information to file fraudulent tax returns electronically and claim bogus refunds. This is usually done early in the tax filing season. When the real taxpayers file, they're notified that they're attempting to file duplicate returns.

A victim typically discovers the fraud after he or she files a tax return and is informed by the IRS that the return has been rejected because one with the same Social Security number has already been filed for the same tax year. The IRS then must determine who the legitimate taxpayer is.

Tax identity theft can cause major complications to straighten out and significantly delay legitimate refunds. But if you file first, it will be the tax return filed by a potential thief that will be rejected -- not yours.

What to look for

Of course, in order to file your tax return, you'll need to have your W-2s and 1099s. So another key date to be aware of is Jan. 31 -- the deadline for employers to issue 2017 W-2s to employees and, generally, for businesses to issue 1099s to recipients of any 2017 interest, dividend or reportable miscellaneous income payments. So be sure to keep an eye on your mailbox or your employer's internal website.

Additional bonus

An additional bonus: If you'll be getting a refund, filing early will generally enable you to receive and enjoy that money sooner. (Bear in mind, however, that a law requires the IRS to hold until mid-February refunds on returns claiming the earned income tax credit or additional child tax credit.) Let us know if you have questions about tax identity theft or would like help filing your 2017 return early.

Prince & Tuohey CPA Ltd. is located at 2836 Malvern Ave. Suite D, Hot Springs, AR 71901. Call 501-262-5500 or visit website http://www.princetuohey.com for more information.

Business on 01/08/2018

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